Secondary Prevention after Acute Coronary Syndrome

Moderator:

Discussants:

  • Summary:

    Dr. Paul D. Thompson from the Division of Cardiology, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, CT, moderated the topic “Secondary Prevention after Acute Coronary Syndrome” with Drs. James de Lemos from the Division of Cardiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX; Carl Lavie from the Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute, The University of Queensland School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA; and Francis Kiernan from the Division of Cardiology, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, CT.

    The discussion focused primarily on:

    1. Interventions to start during acute care with an aim toward secondary prevention;
    2. length of treatment with beta blockers;
    3. acute and long-term approaches to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors;
    4. pharmacological approaches for myocardial infarction patients managed by acute angioplasty;
    5. benefits and optimal doses of statins before and after angioplasty;
    6. treatment recommendations for platelet inhibition in patients with drug-eluting and bare-metal stents;
    7. choice of beta blocker and platelet therapy;
    8. long-term use of high-dose statins;
    9. target low-density lipoprotein levels in the long-term;
    10. the importance of cardiac rehabilitation, exercise training, and fitness in secondary prevention;
    11. the need for proactive referral to increase participation and completion of cardiac rehabilitation programs;
    12. benefits of cardiac rehabilitation on psychological stress;
    13. the most appropriate long-term secondary prevention antiplatelet regimen;
    14. risks of combination dual antiplatelet therapy with an oral anticoagulant;
    15. optimal aspirin doses;
    16. bedside and genetic testing of platelet functions; and
    17. use of fibric acid derivatives, niacin, and coenzyme Q10 as statin alternatives.

    (Med Roundtable Cardiovasc Ed. 2014;3(4):251–261)

    ©2014 FoxP2 Media, LLC

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